Notes on Air Force Handbook 1, dated 1 Nov 21, Chapter 7, Assessments and Recognition


7 Feb 2022. The 2021 Air Force Handbook is not available and may not exist. The E-5 and E-6 Study Guides were released and posted to the official Air Force website (https://www.studyguides.af.mil/) on 1 Feb 2022. This website was updated using the content from the E-6 Study Guide under the assumption that both study guides contained the same content. However, there are differences between the two study guides as noted below. Questions related to these differences have been removed or edited, as necessary, to avoid conflict between the two versions and ensure accuracy.


The phrase, "Air Force", was replaced globally by "USAF" in the E-5 Study Guide.


Section 7A, Airman Comprehensive Assessment

2021 E5 Study Guide

7.1. Airman Comprehensive Assessment Administration

The Airman Comprehensive Assessment (ACA) is used during formal communication between a rater and a ratee to communicate responsibility, accountability, USAF culture, an Airman's critical role in support of the mission, individual readiness, expectations regarding duty performance, and how well the ratee is meeting those expectations. Also, during feedback sessions, raters will provide the ratee with the most current USAF Benefits Fact Sheet. The ACA is designed to increase Airmen interaction and support at all levels, provide Airmen an opportunity to discuss personal and professional goals, and assist Airmen in achieving those goals. Once the ACA has been completed, raters will give the original, completed, and signed worksheet to the ratee, and maintain copies of all completed ACAs and all signed ACA notices, or appropriate statements (RegAF only).

Unit commanders are responsible for developing a tracking mechanism for ACAs and ensuring they are conducted properly. Rater's raters will monitor personnel to ensure ACAs are conducted, as required. When a lower-level rater is not available due to unusual circumstances, or when officially assuming the subordinate rater's responsibilities, the rater's rater will conduct ACA sessions in place of the rater. Ratees are responsible for knowing when their ACA sessions are due. When a required or requested ACA does not take place, ratees will notify the rater and, if necessary, the rater's rater.

ACAs are mandatory for officers up through the rank of Colonel, and for all RegAF and Air Reserve Component personnel. For student officers receiving AF Form 475, Education/Training Report, or for enlisted personnel in initial or advanced skills training, an ACA is not required, but may be given at the discretion of school leadership. For performance evaluations completed on non-rated initial or advanced skills training students, documented academic progress reports, such as the AETC Form 156, Student Training Report, will serve in-lieu of the mandatory mid-term ACA. The mid-term ACA is a mandatory supporting document to be routed with the performance evaluation, but will not be made a matter of official record.

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.1. Airman Comprehensive Assessment Administration

The Airman Comprehensive Assessment (ACA) is used during formal communication between a rater and a ratee to communicate responsibility, accountability, Air Force culture, an Airman's critical role in support of the mission, individual readiness, expectations regarding duty performance, and how well the ratee is meeting those expectations. Also, during feedback sessions, raters will provide the ratee with the most current Air Force Benefits Fact Sheet. The ACA is designed to increase Airmen interaction and support at all levels, provide Airmen an opportunity to discuss personal and professional goals, and assist Airmen in achieving those goals. Once the ACA has been completed, raters will give the original, completed, and signed worksheet to the ratee, and maintain copies of all completed ACAs and all signed ACA notices, or appropriate statements (active duty only).

Unit commanders are responsible for developing a tracking mechanism for ACAs and ensuring they are conducted properly. Rater's raters will monitor personnel to ensure ACAs are conducted, as required. When a lower-level rater is not available due to unusual circumstances, or when officially assuming the subordinate rater's responsibilities, the rater's rater will conduct ACA sessions in place of the rater. Ratees are responsible for knowing when their ACA sessions are due.When a required or requested ACA does not take place, ratees will notify the rater and, if necessary,the rater's rater.

ACAs are mandatory for officers up through the rank of Colonel, and for all active duty and Air Reserve Component personnel. For student officers receiving AF Form 475, Education/Training Report, or for enlisted personnel in initial or advanced skills training, an ACA is not required, but may be given at the discretion of school leadership. For performance evaluations completed on non-rated initial or advanced skills training students, documented academic progress reports, such as the AETC Form 156, Student Training Report, will serve in-lieu of the mandatory mid-term ACA. The mid-term ACA is a mandatory supporting document to be routed with the performance evaluation, but will not be made a matter of official record.


Section 7B, Performance Evaluations

2021 E5 Study Guide

7.5. Performance Evaluation Administration

The performance evaluation system is designed to provide a reliable, long-term, cumulative record of performance and potential. The key aspects associated with the evaluation system are how well the individual does his or her job and the qualities the individual brings to the job. It is important for supervisors to help subordinates understand their strengths and weaknesses and how their efforts contribute to the mission. Supervisors must understand how and when to employ the officer and enlisted evaluation systems and the civilian performance program.

Access to Evaluations. Evaluations are For Official Use Only and are subject to the Public Law 93-579, Privacy Act 1974, 31 December 1974. They are exempt from public disclosure under Department of Defense Manual (DoDM) 5400.07-R_AFMAN 33-302, Freedom of Information Act Program, 27 April 2018 and AFI 33-332, Air Force Privacy and Civil Liberties Program, 10 March 2020. Only persons within the agency who have a proper need to know may read evaluations. The office with custodial responsibility determines if a person's official duties require access. Classified information should not be included in any section of evaluation forms or on attachments to evaluations, referral documents, or endorsements to referral documents. Specific instructions for completing evaluations, with reference to proper formatting, appropriate raters/evaluators, additional raters, content, acronym use, classified information, and other details, are found in AFI 36-2406, Officer and Enlisted Evaluation Systems, 25 June 2021.

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.5. Performance Evaluation Administration

The performance evaluation system is designed to provide a reliable, long-term, cumulative record of performance and potential. The key aspects associated with the evaluation system are how well the individual does his or her job and the qualities the individual brings to the job. It is important for supervisors to help subordinates understand their strengths and weaknesses and how their efforts contribute to the mission. Supervisors must understand how and when to employ the officer and enlisted evaluation systems and the civilian performance program.

Access to Evaluations. Evaluations are For Official Use Only and are subject to the Privacy Act. They are exempt from public disclosure under DoDM 5400.07-R/AFMAN 33-302, Freedom of Information Act Program, and AFI 33-332, Air Force Privacy and Civil Liberties Program. Only persons within the agency who have a proper need to know may read evaluations. The office with custodial responsibility determines if a person's official duties require access. Classified information should not be included in any section of evaluation forms or on attachments to evaluations, referral documents, or endorsements to referral documents. Specific instructions for completing evaluations, with reference to proper formatting, appropriate raters/evaluators, additional raters, content, acronym use, classified information, and other details, are found in AFI 36-2406, Officer and Enlisted Evaluation Systems.


Section 7C, Reenlistments and Continuation

2021 E5 Study Guide

7.16. USAF Retraining Program
Retraining is a force management tool used primarily to balance career fields (officer and enlisted) across all AFSCs, and to ensure sustainability of career fields. Retraining also provides a means to return disqualified Airmen to a productive status. Although Airmen maybe selected for involuntary retraining based on USAF needs, the retraining program allows a limited number of Airmen the opportunity to pursue other career paths in the USAF. The Online Retraining Advisory is a living document found on myPers, maintained by the Air Force Personnel Center as a key tool used to advise members of retraining opportunities. For additional information on retraining eligibility and application procedures, refer to: AFMAN 36-2100.

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.16. Air Force Retraining Program
Retraining is a force management tool used primarily to balance career fields (officer and enlisted) across all AFSCs, and to ensure sustainability of career fields. Retraining also provides a means to return disqualified Airmen to a productive status. Although Airmen maybe selected for involuntary retraining based on Air Force needs, the retraining program allows a limited number of Airmen the opportunity to pursue other career paths in the Air Force. The Online Retraining Advisory is a living document found on myPers, maintained by the Air Force Personnel Center as a key tool used to advise members of retraining opportunities. For additional information on retraining eligibility and application procedures, refer to: AFI 36-2626, Airman Retraining Program.

2021 E5 Study Guide

7.17. Officer Crossflow and Reclassification Programs
Tools and procedures are available to address career field manning imbalances and shape the officer force within authorized, funded end-strength. The Nonrated Line Crossflow Program addresses manning shortages and overages by conducting a crossflow panel when needed to select the best qualified officers to fill the required vacancies. The Missileer Crossflow Program is a process ensuring the Nuclear and Missile Operations (13N) Air Force specialty remains balanced for sustainment by crossflowing excess officers at the four-year point back to donor career fields. Out-of-cycle crossflow requests, as well as initial skills training reclassification, are additional programs to ensure

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.17. Officer Crossflow and Reclassification Programs
Tools and procedures are available to address career field manning imbalances and shape the officer force within authorized, funded end-strength. The Nonrated Line Crossflow Program addresses manning shortages and overages by conducting a crossflow panel when needed to select the best qualified officers to fill the required vacancies. The Missileer Crossflow Program is a process ensuring the Nuclear and Missile Operations (13N) Air Force specialty remains balanced for sustainment by crossflowing excess officers at the four-year point back to donor career fields. Out-of-cycle crossflow requests, as well as initial skills training reclassification, are additional programs to ensure the balance of officer career fields.



Changes since the 2019 edition of the Air Force Handbook

This chapter is composed of Sections A, B, and C of the 2019 AFH-1's Chapter 8, Assessments and Recognition. Paragraph 7.12. Noncommissioned Officer Career Status Program, is new material. Paragraph 7.13. Career Job Reservation Program, contains new material. Note: The Retraining Program is described in both paragraph 7.16. and in paragraph 6.18. There is no conflict in information.


Section 7A, Airman Comprehensive Assessment

Paragraph 7.1. The term, Regular Air Force, was replaced by "active duty".

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.1. Airman Comprehensive Assessment Administration

The Airman Comprehensive Assessment (ACA) is used during formal communication between a rater and a ratee to communicate responsibility, accountability, Air Force culture, an Airman's critical role in support of the mission, individual readiness, expectations regarding duty performance, and how well the ratee is meeting those expectations. Also, during feedback sessions, raters will provide the ratee with the most current Air Force Benefits Fact Sheet. The ACA is designed to increase Airmen interaction and support at all levels, provide Airmen an opportunity to discuss personal and professional goals, and assist Airmen in achieving those goals. Once the ACA has been completed, raters will give the original, completed, and signed worksheet to the ratee, and maintain copies of all completed ACAs and all signed ACA notices, or appropriate statements (active duty only).

Unit commanders are responsible for developing a tracking mechanism for ACAs and ensuring they are conducted properly. Rater's raters will monitor personnel to ensure ACAs are conducted, as required. When a lower-level rater is not available due to unusual circumstances, or when officially assuming the subordinate rater's responsibilities, the rater's rater will conduct ACA sessions in place of the rater. Ratees are responsible for knowing when their ACA sessions are due. When a required or requested ACA does not take place, ratees will notify the rater and, if necessary,the rater's rater.

ACAs are mandatory for officers up through the rank of Colonel, and for all active duty and Air Reserve Component personnel. For student officers receiving AF Form 475, Education/Training Report, or for enlisted personnel in initial or advanced skills training, an ACA is not required, but may be given at the discretion of school leadership. For performance evaluations completed on non-rated initial or advanced skills training students, documented academic progress reports, such as the AETC Form 156, Student Training Report, will serve in-lieu of the mandatory mid-term ACA. The mid-term ACA is a mandatory supporting document to be routed with the performance evaluation, but will not be made a matter of official record.

2019 AFH-1

8.1. Airman Comprehensive Assessment Administration

The Airman Comprehensive Assessment (ACA) is used during formal communication between a rater and a ratee to communicate responsibility, accountability, Air Force culture, an Airman's critical role in support of the mission, individual readiness, expectations regarding duty performance, and how well the ratee is meeting those expectations. Also, during feedback sessions, raters will provide the ratee with the most current Air Force Benefits Fact Sheet. The ACA is designed to increase Airmen interaction and support at all levels, provide Airmen an opportunity to discuss personal and professional goals, and assist Airmen in achieving those goals. Once the ACA has been completed, raters will give the original, completed, and signed worksheet to the ratee, and maintain copies of all completed ACAs and all signed ACA notices, or appropriate statements (Regular Air Force only).

Unit commanders are responsible for developing a tracking mechanism for ACAs and ensuring they are conducted properly. Rater's raters will monitor personnel to ensure ACAs are conducted, as required. When a lower-level rater is not available due to unusual circumstances, or when officially assuming the subordinate rater's responsibilities, the rater's rater will conduct ACA sessions in place of the rater. Ratees are responsible for knowing when their ACA sessions are due. When a required or requested ACA does not take place, ratees will notify the rater and, if necessary, the rater's rater.

ACAs are mandatory for officers up through the rank of Colonel, and for all Regular Air Force and Air Reserve Component personnel. For student officers receiving AF Form 475, Education/Training Report, or for enlisted personnel in initial or advanced skills training, an ACA is not required, but may be given at the discretion of school leadership. For performance evaluations completed on non-rated initial or advanced skills training students, documented academic progress reports, such as the AETC Form 156, Student Training Report, will serve in-lieu of the mandatory mid-term ACA. The mid-term ACA is a mandatory supporting document to be routed with the performance evaluation, but will not be made a matter of official record.


Section 7C, Reenlistments and Continuation

Paragraph 7.10. The term, civilian, was added and the phrase, Regular Air Force, was replaced by "active".

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.10. Selective Reenlistment Program

The Selective Reenlistment Program applies to all enlisted personnel by which commanders/civilians, directors, and supervisors evaluate first-term, second-term, and career Airmen to ensure the Air Force retains those who consistently demonstrate the capability and willingness of maintaining high professional standards. First-term Airmen receive selective reenlistment consideration when they are within 15 months of their expiration of term of service. Second-term and career Airmen with less than 19 years of total active federal military service are considered within 13 months of the original expiration of term of service. Career Airmen receive selective reenlistment consideration within 13 months of completing 20 years of total active federal military service. Career Airmen who have served beyond 20 years of total active federal military service receive selective reenlistment consideration each time they are within 13 months of their original expiration of term of service.

2019 AFH-1

8.10. Selective Reenlistment Program

The Selective Reenlistment Program applies to all enlisted personnel by which commanders, directors, and supervisors evaluate first-term, second-term, and career Airmen to ensure the Air Force retains those who consistently demonstrate the capability and willingness of maintaining high professional standards. First-term Airmen receive selective reenlistment consideration when they are within 15 months of their expiration of term of service. Second-term and career Airmen with less than 19 years of total Regular Air Force federal military service are considered within 13 months of the original expiration of term of service. Career Airmen receive selective reenlistment consideration within 13 months of completing 20 years of total Regular Air Force federal military service. Career Airmen who have served beyond 20 years of total Regular Air Force federal military service receive selective reenlistment consideration each time they are within 13 months of their original expiration of term of service.


Paragraph 7.11. A sentence was added to the end of the paragraph: "Commanders may also conduct selective reenlistment consideration at any time outside the standardized window."

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.11. Selective Reenlistment Program Considerations

Commanders and civilian directors consider enlisted performance report ratings, unfavorable information from any substantiated source, the Airman's willingness to comply with Air Force standards, and the Airman's ability (or lack thereof) to meet required training and duty performance levels when determining if a member may reenlist. Supervisors should carefully evaluate the Airman's duty performance and review the Airman's personnel records, to include the AF Form 1137, Unfavorable Information File Summary, if applicable, before making a recommendation to unit commanders and civilian directors concerning the Airman's career potential.

Non-Selectee. If an Airman is not selected for reenlistment, an AF Form 418, Selective Reenlistment Program Consideration, is completed, and the Airman is informed of the decision. The commander sends the completed form to the military personnel flight after the Airman signs and initials the appropriate blocks. The commander must make sure the Airman understands the right to appeal the decision. The Airman has up to three calendar days to render an appeal intent. The Airman must submit the appeal to the military personnel flight within 10 calendar days of the date he or she renders the appeal intent on the form.

Appeal Authority. The specific appeal authority is based on an Airman's total active federal military service. The appeal authority for first-term Airmen and career Airmen who will complete at least 20 years of total active federal military service on their current expiration of term of service appeal selective reenlistment program non-selection is the respective group commander. The appeal authority for second-term and career Airmen who will complete fewer than 16 years of total active federal military service on their current expiration of term of service is the respective wing commander. The appeal authority for second-term and career Airmen who will complete at least 16 years of total active federal military service but fewer than 20 years of total active federal military service on their current expiration of term of service, is the Secretary of the Air Force. The decision of the appeal authority is final. The appeal authority's decision is documented and the Airman is advised of the outcome. Commanders may also conduct selective reenlistment consideration at any time outside the standardized window.

2019 AFH-1

8.11. Selective Reenlistment Considerations

Commanders and directors consider enlisted performance report ratings, unfavorable information from any substantiated source, the Airman's willingness to comply with Air Force standards, and the Airman's ability (or lack thereof) to meet required training and duty performance levels when determining if a member may reenlist. Supervisors should carefully evaluate the Airman's duty performance and review the Airman's personnel records, to include the AF Form 1137, Unfavorable Information File Summary, if applicable, before making a recommendation to unit commanders and directors concerning the Airman's career potential.

Non-Selectee. If an Airman is not selected for reenlistment, an AF Form 418, Selective Reenlistment Program Consideration for Airmen in the Regular Air Force/Air Force Reserve, is completed, and the Airman is informed of the decision. The commander must make sure the Airman understands the right to appeal the decision. The Airman has up to three calendar days to render an appeal intent. The Airman must submit the appeal to the military personnel section within 10 calendar days of the date he or she renders the appeal intent on the form. The commander sends the completed form to the military personnel section after the Airman signs and initials the appropriate blocks.

Appeal Authority. The specific appeal authority is based on an Airman's total Regular Air Force federal military service. The appeal authority for first-term Airmen and career Airmen who will complete at least 20 years of total Regular Air Force federal military service on their current expiration of term of service appeal selective reenlistment program non-selection is the respective group commander. The appeal authority for second-term and career Airmen who will complete fewer than 16 years of total Regular Air Force federal military service on their current expiration of term of service is the respective wing commander. The appeal authority for second-term and career Airmen who will complete at least 16 years of total Regular Air Force federal military service but fewer than 20 years of total Regular Air Force federal military service on their current expiration of term of service, is the Secretary of the Air Force. The decision of the appeal authority is final. The appeal authority's decision is documented and the Airman is advised of the outcome.


Paragraph 7.12. is NEW content.

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.12. Noncommissioned Officer Career Status Program

The Noncommissioned Officer Career Status Program extends the length of reenlistments for active duty Airmen. All Airmen who have been selected for continued service by their commander/civilian director (to include those with approved waivers), and who have at least 12 years total active federal military service on date of discharge (day prior to reenlistment) will be reenlisted for an unspecified period. These Airmen will serve up to their High Year of Tenure based on current grade, or if promoted, projected grade unless sooner separated by Air Force policyor law under the NCO Career Status Program. Airmen who serve 20 or more years of total active federal military service may retire, if otherwise eligible, no later than the first day of the month following High Year of Tenure.

This program streamlines the reenlistment and extension process and alleviates unnecessary administrative actions for Airmen, supervisor chains, and military personnel flights.

2019 AFH-1

Not in 2019 AFH-1


Paragraph 7.13. Career Job Reservation Program. There are lots of changes and the terms, Constrained and Unconstrained, are new material.

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.13. Career Job Reservation Program

Because of various career force size and composition restrictions, there are times when the Air Force must place a limit on the number of authorized first-term Airmen who may reenlist. The Career Job Reservation (CJR) Program exists to assist in the management of first-term Airmen reenlistments by Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) to prevent surpluses and shortages. All eligible first-term Airmen must have an approved CJR to reenlist. Airmen are automatically placed on the career job applicant list on the first duty day of the month during which they complete 35 months on their current enlistment (59 months for six-year enlistees), but no later than the last duty day of the month during which they complete 43 months on their current enlistment (67 months for six- year enlistees). To keep their approved CJR, Airmen must reenlist on or before the CJR expiration date. CJRs may be constrained (limited) quotas or unconstrained (unlimited) quotas.

Constrained: First-term Airmen in constrained AFSCs have limited quotas, when available and compete for a CJR. Commanders or civilian directors recommend award of CJRs to Airmen in constrained AFSCs where an allocation has been awarded. Approval of CJRs are made at the group commander level or equivalent. Commanders or civilian directors may recommend First Term Airmen for award of a CJR anytime during the Airman's CJR window. Airmen outside their CJR window are not eligible for award of a CJR. Airmen's EPRs must reflect that the member has met the minimum expectation and not have an unfavorable information file, lost time, or record of active nonjudicial punishment on their current enlistment in order to be considered for a CJR. The Airman's job performance, demonstrated leadership, how the Airmen exemplifies Air Force core values, and ability to succeed in the AFSC should also be considered. Upon Airmen entering their CJR window, commanders or civilian directors are encouraged to advise Airmen on their potential for a CJR and when appropriate, encourage retraining.

When constrained AFSCs are implemented, Air Force Personnel Center issues CJR quotas on a fiscal year basis and selection authorities may consider Airmen by board, nomination packages, etc. Airmen who are on the CJR waiting list and whose AFSC is removed from the constrained list will receive a CJR. Airmen who are removed from the waiting list prior to the AFSC being removed, will not receive supplemental consideration. If eligible, Airmen qualify for award of a CJR when an allocation exists and the Airman is in their CJR eligibility window. When the group commander (or equivalent) approves an Airman for award of a CJR, Air Force Personnel Center will verify an allocation exists and will reduce the number of remaining CJRs accordingly. NOTE: Approved CJRs do not expire until the Airman's date of separation.

Unconstrained: Airmen in unconstrained AFSCs do not compete for a CJR. Airmen are automatically awarded the CJR on the first duty day of the month during which they complete 35 months on their current enlistment (59 months for six-year enlistees), but no later than the last duty day of the month during which they complete 43 months on their current enlistment (67 months for six-year enlistees), provided they have been selected for continued service by their commander/civilian director under the selective reenlistment program.

2019 AFH-1

8.12. Career Job Reservation Program

Because of various career force size and composition restrictions, there are times when the Air Force must place a limit on the number of authorized first-term Airmen who may reenlist. The Career Job Reservation (CJR) Program exists to assist in the management of first-term Airmen reenlistments by Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) to prevent surpluses and shortages. All eligible first-term Airmen must have an approved CJR to reenlist. Airmen are automatically placed on the career job applicant list on the first duty day of the month during which they complete 35 months on their current enlistment (59 months for six-year enlistees), but no later than the last duty day of the month during which they complete 43 months on their current enlistment (67 months for six-year enlistees). To keep their approved CJR, Airmen must reenlist on or before the CJR expiration date.

When the number of CJR applicants exceeds the number of available quotas, the Air Force Personnel Center must use a rank-order process to determine which Airmen will receive an approved CJR. Airmen compete for a CJR in their respective initial term of enlistment group (four-year or six-year enlistees). Applicants are ranked using the following factors: Unfavorable Information File (automatic disqualifier), top three performance reports, current grade, projected grade, date of rank, and total Regular Air Force federal military service date. Applicants are placed on the Air Force-wide career job applicant waiting list when there are no CJRs available. An Airman's position on the waiting list is subject to change as his or her rank-order information changes or as new Airmen apply. Airmen may remain on the waiting list until their 43rd month on their current enlistment (67th month for six-year enlistees).

Note: When Airmen are placed on the waiting list in their AFSC, they may request a CJR in an additionally awarded Air Force specialty if quotas are readily available and if all criteria are met. Supervisors should encourage Airmen to pursue retraining into a shortage skill if a CJR is not immediately available.


Paragraph 7.15. Selective Retention Bonus. Maximum SRB changed from $90,000 to $100,000.

2021 E6 Study Guide

7.15. Selective Retention Bonus

The Selective Retention Bonus (SRB) Program is a monetary incentive paid to Airmen serving in certain selected critical military skills who reenlist for additional obligated service. The bonus is intended to encourage the reenlistment of sufficient numbers of qualified enlisted personnel in military skills with either demonstrated retention shortfalls or high training costs. Airmen in SRB skills who reenlist or extend their enlistment in the active for at least three years are eligible for an SRB provided they meet all criteria listed in AFI 36-2606, Reenlistment and Extension of Enlistment in the United States Air Force. Airmen can expect to serve in the SRB specialty for the entire enlistment for which the bonus was paid.

SRB designations are established by zones, which are determined by the total active federal military service of Airmen at the time of reenlistment or the date they enter the extension. Eligible Airmen may receive an SRB in each zone (A, B, C or E), but only one SRB per zone.

Zone A applies to Airmen reenlisting between 17 months and 6 years.
Zone B applies to Airmen reenlisting between 6 and 10 years.
Zone C applies to Airmen reenlisting between 10 and 14 years.
Zone E applies to Airmen reenlisting between 18 and 20 years.

SRBs are calculated using one month's base pay, multiplied by the number of years reenlisting or extending, multiplied by the SRB multiple as listed on the authorized SRB listing. The maximum SRB per zone is $100,000.

Note: The Airman's base pay on the date of discharge is used to calculate the SRB. Therefore, if an Airman was promoted to Staff Sergeant on 1 May and reenlisted on 1 May, the SRB would be calculated on the base pay of the day prior to the reenlistment as Senior Airman.

2019 AFH-1

8.14. Selective Retention Bonus

The Selective Retention Bonus (SRB) Program is a monetary incentive paid to Airmen serving in certain selected critical military skills who reenlist for additional obligated service. The bonus is intended to encourage the reenlistment of sufficient numbers of qualified enlisted personnel in military skills with either demonstrated retention shortfalls or high training costs. Airmen in SRB skills who reenlist or extend their enlistment in the Regular Air Force for at least three years are eligible for an SRB provided they meet all criteria listed in AFI 36-2606, Reenlistment and Extension of Enlistment in the United States Air Force. Airmen can expect to serve in the SRB specialty for the entire enlistment for which the bonus was paid.

SRB designations are established by zones, which are determined by the total Regular Air Force federal military service of Airmen at the time of reenlistment or the date they enter the extension. Eligible Airmen may receive an SRB in each zone (A, B, C or E), but only one SRB per zone.

Zone A applies to Airmen reenlisting between 17 months and 6 years.
Zone B applies to Airmen reenlisting between 6 and 10 years.
Zone C applies to Airmen reenlisting between 10 and 14 years.
Zone E applies to Airmen reenlisting between 18 and 20 years.

SRBs are calculated using one month's base pay, multiplied by the number of years reenlisted, multiplied by the SRB multiple as listed on the authorized SRB listing. The maximum SRB per zone is $90,000.

Note: The Airman's base pay on the date of discharge is used to calculate the SRB. Therefore, if an Airman was promoted to Staff Sergeant on 1 May and reenlisted on 1 May, the SRB would be calculated on the base pay of the day prior to the reenlistment as Senior Airman.