Notes on AFH-1, 1 Nov 21, Chapter 24, Professionalism


This chapter's content was taken from the 2019 Air Force Handbook's Chapter 25, Professionalism.


17 Feb 2022. The E-5 and E-6 Study Guides were released and posted to the official Air Force website (https://www.studyguides.af.mil/) on 1 Feb 2022. This website was updated using the content from the E-6 Study Guide under the assumption that both study guides contained the same content. However, there are differences between the two study guides as noted below. Questions related to these differences have been removed or edited, as necessary, to avoid conflict between the two versions and ensure accuracy.

The phrases, "Air Force" and "Regular Air Force" were replaced globally by "USAF" and "RegAF" in the E-5 Study Guide.

Paragraph numbering in Sections C and D is different in the two study guides. Affected questions were updated to show both references.






2021 E-5 and E-6 Study Guides Compared


2021 E5 Study Guide

Section 24A-USAF Professional

24.1. Professionalism

Professionalism describes who we are as a service and how we conduct ourselves as Airmen and representatives of the USAF. It sets the standards all Airmen are expected to adhere to and exceed. Professionalism within the USAF is framed by the requirements of trust, loyalty, dignity, and personal commitment. We must be dependable and responsible for our own actions while being good wingmen for fellow Airmen and co-workers. At the root of professionalism is respect. Respect is what bonds every Airman's contribution to the mission with the collective understanding of what it means to serve with humility and deference for those we serve with.

The USAF is a Total Force that effectively leverages the unique capabilities of officer, enlisted, and civilian Airmen across RegAF, Guard, Reserve, and Auxiliary Components. As a Total Force, we are a values-based, mission-focused, people-oriented air and space force. Professionalism is the heart and soul of who we are and who we aspire to be every day. Our sense of professionalism underlies the pride we feel when we say, "I am an American Airman."

Professional Obligation and Status. Every Airman has an obligation to be the very best professional possible. As stated in AFI 1-1, the USAF has a very important national defense mission; and you, as a member of the USAF, have serious responsibilities for carrying out that mission. You are responsible for following orders, performing specific daily tasks related to your duties, and living up to the high standards of the USAF. Maintaining good order and discipline is paramount for mission accomplishment. Our core values demand that Airmen treat others with genuine dignity, fairness, and respect at all times. Each Airman is entitled to fair and unbiased treatment, and each Airman has an obligation to care for, teach, and lead others. We must also maintain loyalty to the USAF's core values and standards and maintain professionalism and respect for others regardless of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, disability, or sexual orientation. This respect for others not only involves personal interaction, but also extends to communications and interactions in social media and cyberspace. You must never degrade the public's trust and confidence in the USAF and in you.

Professional status comes to people at different times in their lives and careers. Professional status is expressed by attitudes and commitments, and by internalizing military values. Studying and understanding these factors are vital to Airmen and the future of the USAF. Professional military members of today and tomorrow must accept responsibility for their actions, hold others accountable, and take appropriate action to never hide behind excuses. Focus must be directed toward devoted service to the nation, not on pay, working conditions, or the next assignment. Our Air Force is a critical part of the greatest fighting force the world has ever known. It is powered by the greatest Airmen the world has ever seen.

Mission-Focused. As Airmen, we stand ready, performing selfless duty in defense of our Nation. We, and our families, are dedicated to answering our Nation's call, making sacrifices for the good of the mission. We, as Airmen, must have the courage to take appropriate risks when necessary. Our heritage of breaking barriers and accelerating faster, farther, and first drives us to see things differently, continually innovate, and improve our craft to execute the mission.

People-Oriented. Our most important resource is the people who commit to serving as USAF professionals. Taking care of our wingmen is our duty. We are an integrated force -strong, able, and ready. We, as Airmen, value the contribution of every USAF member and motivate each other to achieve excellence. We honor and respect all who serve, and when we strengthen our alliances -we are stronger together.

Diversity. Diversity is a military necessity. USAF capabilities and warfighting skills are enhanced by diversity among its personnel. At its core, such diversity provides our Total Force an aggregation of strengths, perspectives, and capabilities that transcends individual contributions. USAF personnel who work in a diverse environment learn to maximize individual strengths and to combine individual abilities and perspectives for the good of the mission. Our ability to attract a larger, highly talented, diverse pool of applicants for service with the USAF, both military and civilian, and develop and retain our current personnel will impact our future Total Force. Diversity is about strengthening our force and ensuring our long-term viability to support our mission.

2021 E6 Study Guide

Section 24A-Air Force Professionalism

24.1. Professionalism

Professionalism describes who we are as a service and how we conduct ourselves as Airmen and representatives of the Air Force. It sets the standards all Airmen are expected to adhere to and exceed. Professionalism within the Air Force is framed by the requirements of trust, loyalty, dignity, and personal commitment. We must be dependable and responsible for our own actions while being good wingmen for fellow Airmen and co-workers. At the root of professionalism is respect. Respect is what bonds every Airman's contribution to the mission with the collective understanding of what it means to serve with humility and deference for those we serve with.

The Air Force is a Total Force that effectively leverages the unique capabilities of officer, enlisted, and civilian Airmen across Regular Air Force, Guard, Reserve, and Auxiliary Components. As a Total Force, we are a values-based, mission-focused, people-oriented air and space force. Professionalism is the heart and soul of who we are and who we aspire to be every day. Our sense of professionalism underlies the pride we feel when we say, "I am an American Airman."

Professional Obligation and Status. Every Airman has an obligation to be the very best professional possible. As stated in AFI 1-1, Air Force Standards, the Air Force has a very important national defense mission; and you, as a member of the Air Force, have serious responsibilities for carrying out that mission. You are responsible for following orders, performing specific daily tasks related to your duties, and living up to the high standards of the Air Force. Maintaining good order and discipline is paramount for mission accomplishment. Our core values demand that Airmen treat others with genuine dignity, fairness, and respect at all times. Each Airman is entitled to fair and unbiased treatment, and each Airman has an obligation to care for, teach, and lead others. We must also maintain loyalty to the Air Force's core values and standards and maintain professionalism and respect for others regardless of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, disability, or sexual orientation. This respect for others not only involves personal interaction, but also extends to communications and interactions in social media and cyberspace. You must never degrade the public's trust and confidence in the United States Air Force and in you.

Professional status comes to people at different times in their lives and careers. Professional status is expressed by attitudes and commitments, and by internalizing military values. Studying and understanding these factors are vital to Airmen and the future of the Air Force. Professional military members of today and tomorrow must accept responsibility for their actions, hold others accountable, and take appropriate action to never hide behind excuses. Focus must be directed toward devoted service to the Nation, not on pay, working conditions, or the next assignment. Our Air Force is a critical part of the greatest fighting force the world has ever known. It is powered by the greatest Airmen the world has ever seen.

Mission-Focused. As Airmen, we stand ready, performing selfless duty in defense of our Nation. We, and our families, are dedicated to answering our Nation's call, making sacrifices for the good of the mission. We, as Airmen, must have the courage to take appropriate risks when necessary. Our heritage of breaking barriers and accelerating faster, farther, and first drives us to see things differently, continually innovate, and improve our craft to execute the mission.

People-Oriented. Our most important resource is the people who commit to serving as Air Force professionals. Taking care of our wingmen is our duty. We are an integrated force -strong, able, and ready. We, as Airmen, value the contribution of every Air Force member and motivate each other to achieve excellence. We honor and respect all who serve, and when we strengthen our alliances -we are stronger together.

Diversity. Diversity is a military necessity. Air Force capabilities and warfighting skills are enhanced by diversity among its personnel. At its core, such diversity provides our Total Force an aggregation of strengths, perspectives, and capabilities that transcends individual contributions. Air Force personnel who work in a diverse environment learn to maximize individual strengths and to combine individual abilities and perspectives for the good of the mission. Our ability to attract a larger, highly talented, diverse pool of applicants for service with the Air Force, both military and civilian, and develop and retain our current personnel will impact our future Total Force. Diversity is about strengthening our force and ensuring our long-term viability to support our mission.


2021 E5 Study Guide

Section 24C-USAF Core Values

24.3. The USAF Core Values

At the heart and soul of our profession, the USAF recognizes our core values as universal, consistent standards used to evaluate the ethical climate of all USAF organizations. When needed in the cauldron of war, core values are the beacons that light the path of professional conduct and the highest ideals.

2021 E6 Study Guide

Section 24C-Air Force Core Values

24.2. The Air Force Core Values

At the heart and soul of our profession, the Air Force recognizes our core values as universal, consistent standards used to evaluate the ethical climate of all Air Force organizations. When needed in the cauldron of war, core values are the beacons that light the path of professional conduct and the highest ideals.






2021 E-6 Study Guide and 2019 Air Force Handbook Compared



Section 24A, Air Force Professionalism

Paragraph 24.1. Professionalism: The paragraph titled, Professional Obligation and Status, was heavily edited. The sub paragraphs were changed from Mission-Focused, People-Oriented, and Values-Driven to Mission-Focused, People-Oriented, and Diversity. The paragraph titled "Values-Driven" was removed and replaced by a new paragraph titled, "Diversity".


2021 E-6 Study Guide

24.1. Professionalism

Professionalism describes who we are as a service and how we conduct ourselves as Airmen and representatives of the Air Force. It sets the standards all Airmen are expected to adhere to -and exceed. Professionalism within the Air Force is framed by the requirements of trust, loyalty, dignity, and personal commitment. We must be dependable and responsible for our own actions while being good wingmen for fellow Airmen and co-workers. At the root of professionalism is respect. Respect is what bonds every Airman's contribution to the mission with the collective understanding of what it means to serve with humility and deference for those we serve with.

The Air Force is a Total Force that effectively leverages the unique capabilities of officer, enlisted, and civilian Airmen across Regular Air Force, Guard, Reserve, and Auxiliary Components. As a Total Force, we are a values-based, mission-focused, people-oriented air and space force. Professionalism is the heart and soul of who we are and who we aspire to be every day. Our sense of professionalism underlies the pride we feel when we say, "I am an American Airman."

Professional Obligation and Status. Every Airman has an obligation to be the very best professional possible. As stated in AFI 1-1, Air Force Standards, the Air Force has a very important national defense mission; and you, as a member of the Air Force, have serious responsibilities for carrying out that mission. You are responsible for following orders, performing specific daily tasks related to your duties, and living up to the high standards of the Air Force. Maintaining good order and discipline is paramount for mission accomplishment. Our core values demand that Airmen treat others with genuine dignity, fairness, and respect at all times. Each Airman is entitled to fair and unbiased treatment, and each Airman has an obligation to care for, teach, and lead others. We must also maintain loyalty to the Air Force's core values and standards and maintain professionalism and respect for others regardless of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, disability, or sexual orientation. This respect for others not only involves personal interaction, but also extends to communications and interactions in social media and cyberspace. You must never degrade the public's trust and confidence in the United States Air Force and in you.

Professional status comes to people at different times in their lives and careers. Professional status is expressed by attitudes and commitments, and by internalizing military values. Studying and understanding these factors are vital to Airmen and the future of the Air Force. Professional military members of today and tomorrow must accept responsibility for their actions, hold others accountable, and take appropriate action to never hide behind excuses. Focus must be directed toward devoted service to the Nation, not on pay, working conditions, or the next assignment. Our Air Force is a critical part of the greatest fighting force the world has ever known. It is powered by the greatest Airmen the world has ever seen.

Mission-Focused. As Airmen, we stand ready, performing selfless duty in defense of our Nation. We, and our families, are dedicated to answering our Nation's call, making sacrifices for the good of the mission. We, as Airmen, must have the courage to take appropriate risks when necessary. Our heritage of breaking barriers and accelerating faster, farther, and first drives us to see things differently, continually innovate, and improve our craft to execute the mission.

People-Oriented. Our most important resource is the people who commit to serving as Air Force professionals. Taking care of our wingmen is our duty. We are an integrated force -strong, able, and ready. We, as Airmen, value the contribution of every Air Force member and motivate each other to achieve excellence. We honor and respect all who serve, and when we strengthen our alliances -we are stronger together.

Diversity. Diversity is a military necessity. Air Force capabilities and warfighting skills are enhanced by diversity among its personnel. At its core, such diversity provides our Total Force an aggregation of strengths, perspectives, and capabilities that transcends individual contributions. Air Force personnel who work in a diverse environment learn to maximize individual strengths and to combine individual abilities and perspectives for the good of the mission. Our ability to attract a larger, highly talented, diverse pool of applicants for service with the Air Force, both military and civilian, and develop and retain our current personnel will impact our future Total Force. Diversity is about strengthening our force and ensuring our long-term viability to support our mission.

2019 Air Force Handbook

25.1. Professionalism

We are worthy of the Nation's trust by integrating our core values of Integrity First, Service Before Self, and Excellence in All We Do into our mission and everything we do. Professionalism describes who we are as a service and how we conduct ourselves as Airmen and representatives of the U.S. Air Force. It sets the standards all Airmen are expected to adhere to - and exceed. Professionalism within the Air Force is framed by the requirements of trust, loyalty, dignity, and personal commitment. We must be dependable and responsible for our own actions while being good wingmen for fellow Airmen and co-workers. At the root of professionalism is respect. Respect is what bonds every Airman's contribution to the mission with the collective understanding of what it means to serve with humility and deference for those we serve with.

The Air Force is a Total Force that effectively leverages the unique capabilities of officer, enlisted, and civilian Airmen across Regular Air Force, Guard, Reserve, and Auxiliary Components. As a Total Force Air Force, we are a values-based, mission-focused, people-oriented air and space force. Professionalism is the heart and soul of who we are and who we aspire to be every day. Our sense of professionalism underlies the pride we feel when we say I am an American Airman.

Professional Obligation and Status. Every Airman has an obligation to be the very best professional possible. Professional status comes to people at different times in their lives and careers. At what point can an individual claim or profess to have professional military status? As stated in AFI 1-1, Air Force Standards, an Air Force professional's primary responsibility is to do our part to accomplish the mission; however, accomplishing the mission requires more than just technical proficiency. Our conduct and performance must be consistent with the safe and proper fulfillment of instructions, directives, technical orders, and other lawful orders. Quality and quantity of work are both important since they are the primary measures of efficiency and productivity. Professional status is expressed by attitudes and commitments, and by internalizing military values. Studying and understanding these factors are vital to Airmen and the future of the Air Force. Professional military members of today and tomorrow must accept responsibility for their actions, hold others accountable, and take appropriate action to never hide behind excuses. Focus must be directed toward devoted service to the Nation, not on pay, working conditions, or the next assignment. Our Air Force is a critical part of the greatest fighting force the world has ever known. It is powered by the greatest Airmen the world has ever seen.

Values-Driven. We are one Air Force, uniformed and civilian. We, as Airmen, are warriors and professionals dedicated to service and living our values -Integrity, Service and Excellence -doing the right thing, even when no one is looking. We develop partnerships at home and around the world, grounded in integrity and trust. Our culture embraces diversity and fiercely protects character, respect, and leadership.

Mission-Focused. As Airmen, we stand ready, performing selfless duty in defense of our Nation. We, and our families, are dedicated to answering our Nation's call, making sacrifices for the good of the mission. We, as Airmen, are warriors with the courage to take risks when necessary. Our heritage of breaking barriers -going faster, farther, first -drives us to see things differently, continually innovate, and improve our craft.

People-Oriented. Our most important asset is the people who commit to serve as Air Force professionals. Taking care of our wingmen is our duty. We are an integrated force -strong, able, and ready. We, as Airmen, value the contribution of every member of our Air Force team and motivate each other to achieve excellence. We honor and respect all who are brave enough to serve, and we must strengthen our alliances -we are stronger together.




Section 24B, Profession of Arms

NOT TESTABLE




Section 24C, Air Force Core Values


Paragraph 24.2. The Air Force Core Values: no changes; a quote from General Charles Brown was added.

Paragraphs 24.2.1. Integrity First, 24.2.2. Service Before Self, and 24.2.3. Excellence In All We Do, were derived from 2019 AFH-1's single paragraph 25.9. There were no significant changes but all three paragraphs were edited and the paragraph devoted to The Little Blue Book was deleted.

Paragraph 24.2.1. Integrity First: no changes; a quote from CMSAF JoAnne Bass was added.

Paragraph 24.2.2. Service Before Self: all paragraphs were edited especially the paragraph titled Respect, which added new content: "Respect encompasses self-respect, mutual respect, and organizational respect."; a quote from General Mark Welsh was added.

Paragraph 24.2.3. Excellence In All We Do: all paragraphs were edited but contained no significant changes; a quote from CMSAF Kaleth Wright was added.



2021 E-6 Study Guide

24.2. The Air Force Core Values

At the heart and soul of our profession, the Air Force recognizes our core values as universal, consistent standards used to evaluate the ethical climate of all Air Force organizations. When needed in the cauldron of war, core values are the beacons that light the path of professional conduct and the highest ideals.

Integrity First, Service Before Self, and Excellence In All We Do

Values represent enduring, guiding principles for which we stand. Values, such as the Air Force core values of integrity, service, and excellence, should motivate attitudes and actions on- and off duty as essential moral principles or beliefs that are held in the highest regard. Our core values represent the Air Force's firm convictions about the nature of our personal character, our commitment to each other and our Nation, and the manner in which we perform our service. Core values are so fundamental that they define our very identity through a common bond among all professional Airmen -past and present. For those of us who join this proud community, being a part of the Air Force family requires a commitment to living by these values at all times.

Reflecting the Air Force core values in one's personal and professional lives is a challenge that must be faced every day. In doing so, we honor the heritage and continue the legacy of those who served before us and sacrificed so much. It is through this alignment of our actions with these values that we, as an Air Force, earn the public's trust, strengthen our service, and accomplish our mission. This is the expectation of our profession and is the standard that our fellow service members and the American public hold us to.

"    Before you can lead others, you have to lead yourself. We must develop leaders of character that are ready to create and foster environments of respect, inclusivity, and trust. When Airmen know they are valued, have high quality of service and quality of life, and are empowered to reach their full potential -there are no limits to what we can accomplish."

General Charles Q. Brown, Jr.
Air Force Chief of Staff

2019 Air Force Handbook

25.7. The Air Force Core Values

At the heart and soul of our profession, the Air Force recognizes our core values as universal, consistent standards used to evaluate the ethical climate of all Air Force organizations. When needed in the cauldron of war, core values are the beacons that light the path of professional conduct and the highest ideals.

Integrity First, Service Before Self, and Excellence In All We Do

Values represent enduring, guiding principles for which we stand. Values, such as the Air Force core values of integrity, service, and excellence, should motivate attitudes and actions on- and off-duty as essential moral principles or beliefs that are held in the highest regard. Our core values represent the Air Force's firm convictions about the nature of our personal character, our commitment to each other and our Nation, and the manner in which we perform our service. Core values are so fundamental that they define our very identity through a common bond among all professional Airmen - past, and present. For those of us who join this proud community, being a part of the Air Force family requires a commitment to living by these values at all times.

Reflecting the Air Force core values in one's personal and professional lives is a challenge that must be faced every day. In doing so, we honor the heritage and continue the legacy of those who served before us and sacrificed so much. It is through this alignment of our actions with these values that we, as an Air Force, earn the public's trust, strengthen our service, and accomplish our mission. This is the expectation of our profession, and is the standard that our fellow service members and the American public hold us to.

2021 E-6 Study Guide

Not Included

2019 Air Force Handbook

25.8. The Little Blue Book

America's Air Force: A Profession of Arms, has historically been recognized and referred to as, the little blue book. The little blue book is the document containing and prescribing the Air Force core values. An excerpt from America's Air Force: A Profession of Arms states, "First, we must understand that our chosen profession is that of a higher calling in which we hold ourselves to higher standards. To serve proudly and capably, our commitment to our cause must be unbreakable; it must be bonded in our mutual respect for each other. Throughout our service we are guided and reminded of this awesome responsibility. The oaths we take remind us that we serve freely in support and defense of our Constitution. We abide by a code of conduct that captures our resolve, while our Airman's creed highlights the strength of our diverse Airmen who fly, fight, and win as one Air Force. We are the world's greatest Air Force...powered by Airmen, fueled by innovation. We are surrounded by reminders on a daily basis of the meaning of service in our profession...the profession of arms."

2021 E-6 Study Guide

24.2.1. Integrity First.

Integrity provides the bedrock for our military endeavors, and is fortified by service to country. Integrity encompasses many characteristics indispensable to Airmen and makes us who we are and what we stand for. It is the compass that keeps us on the right path when we are confronted with ethical challenges and personal temptations, and it is the foundation upon which trust and respect are built.

Integrity is simply doing the right thing, all the time, whether everyone is watching or no one is watching. An individual realizes integrity when thoughts and actions align with what he or she knows to be right. Following principles, acting with honor, maintaining independent judgment, and performing duties with impartiality, help to maintain integrity and avoid conflicts of interest.

"The foundation of our Profession of Arms is, and has always been, respect. That is a non-negotiable principle that supports the Integrity, Service and Excellence of our great Air Force. It is the cornerstone of the culture we need in our Air Force."

CMSAF JoAnne S. Bass
Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force

Virtues of Core Values

Each of the Air Force core values is further defined by virtues (desired behaviors and characteristics) we must practice and demonstrate in our daily lives, showing we truly do value integrity, service, and excellence. Consistently practicing these virtues results in habits of honorable thought and action, producing an Air Force professional. Air Force professionalism is a shared belief in, and a commitment to, honorable service based on our Air Force core values.




Virtues of Integrity. The virtues of Integrity First are honesty, courage, and accountability.

Honesty. Honesty is the hallmark of integrity. As public servants, we are trusted agents. Honesty requires us to evaluate our performance against standards, and to conscientiously and accurately report findings. It drives us to advance our skills and credentials through our own effort. Our word must be unquestionable. This is the only way to preserve the trust and respect that we hold so dear for one another and the population we serve.

Courage. Courage is not the absence of fear but doing the right thing despite fear. Courage empowers us to take necessary personal or professional risks, make decisions that may be unpopular, and admit our mistakes. Having the courage to take these actions is crucial for the mission, the Air Force, and the Nation.

Accountability. Accountability instills our responsibility while maintaining transparency and ownership for our actions, whether it is the American people, our units, our supervisors, our fellow Airmen, our families, our loved ones, and even ourselves. Accountable individuals maintain transparency, seek honest and constructive feedback, and take ownership of the outcomes of their actions and decisions. They are responsible to themselves and others and refrain from actions which discredit themselves or our service.




24.2.2. Service Before Self.

Service Before Self represents an abiding dedication to the age-old military virtue of selfless dedication to duty, including putting one's life at risk if called to do so. Service Before Self tells us that professional duties take precedence over personal desires. Airmen are practitioners of the profession of arms, entrusted with the security of the Nation, the protection of its citizens, and the preservation of their way of life. In this capacity, Airmen serve as guardians of America's future, and this responsibility requires the needs of service and country to be placed before our own. In today's world, service to country requires not only a high degree of skill, but also a willingness to make personal sacrifices. It requires having the heart and mindset for service that allows us to embrace expectations and requirements not levied on the American public or other professions.







Virtues of Service Before Self. The virtues of Service Before Self are duty, loyalty, and respect.

Duty. Duty is the obligation to perform what is required for the mission. While our responsibilities are determined by the law, the Department of Defense, and Air Force instructions, directives, and guidance, our sense of duty is a personal one and bound by the oath of service we took as individuals. Duty sometimes calls for sacrifice in ways no other profession has or will. Airmen who truly embody Service Before Self consistently choose to make necessary sacrifices to accomplish the mission, and in doing so, we honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Loyalty. Loyalty is an internal commitment to the success and preservation of something bigger than ourselves. Our loyalty is to the Nation first, the values and commitments of our Air Force second, and finally to the men and women with whom we serve. Loyalty to our leaders requires us to trust, follow, and execute their decisions, even when we disagree. We offer alternative solutions and innovative ideas most effectively through the chain of command. Leaders demonstrate loyalty by respecting those who serve and treating them with dignity, compassion, and true concern for their wellbeing. Ultimately, loyalty is demonstrated by helping each other act with respect and honor.

Respect. Respect encompasses self-respect, mutual respect, and organizational respect. This three-dimensional view requires us to embrace the unique value of all individuals and treat everyone with dignity. We must always act in the certain knowledge that all Airmen must be treated with respect and boldly speak up, even when it is uncomfortable, to assert this truth. Further, respecting others requires a commitment to recognize and root out prejudices, biases, and stereotypes. We must engage genuinely, honestly, and with an empathetic and open mind. We must honor the Air Force and others by following our words with actions.

    "Treating EVERY Airman with dignity and respect must be at the heart of who we are and how we operate. It isn't a "tag" line; it's the core of everything we stand for as a service. Everyone in our Air Force should feel respected. Everyone should feel valued. Every single person around you brings something to the fight that you don't. Each of them is critically important to mission success, and they deserve to be treated that way."

General Mark A. Welsh III, 20th Air Force Chief of Staff




24.2.3. Excellence In All We Do

Excellence In All We Do directs us to develop a sustained passion for the continuous improvement and innovation that propels the Air Force, as well as ourselves, beyond the capabilities of our adversaries. Excellence In All We Do does not mean that we demand perfection in everything from everyone. Instead, this core value directs us to continuously advance our craft and increase our knowledge as Airmen.

Excellence In All We Do means that Airmen seek out opportunities and complete developmental education; constantly work hard to stay in physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, and moral shape; continue to enhance professional competencies; and are diligent to maintain their job skills, knowledge, and personal readiness at the highest possible levels. We must have a passion for deliberate continuous improvement and innovation that propels the Air Force to accelerate change or lose now.

Virtues of Excellence In All We Do. The virtues of Excellence In All We Do are mission, discipline, and teamwork.

Mission. Mission focus encompasses operations and excellence in stewardship. The complex undertaking of the Air Force mission requires us to harness the ingenuity, expertise, and elbow grease of all Airmen. We approach it with the mindset of respect, pride, innovation, and a continued commitment to anticipate and embrace change. Our work areas, our processes, and our interpersonal interactions must be undeniably professional and positive. Our people are the platform for delivering innovative ideas, strategies, and technologies to the overall mission.

Discipline. Discipline is an individual commitment to uphold the highest of personal and professional standards. We demonstrate it in attitude, work ethic, and effort directed at continuous improvement, whether pursuing professional military education or nurturing ourselves physically, intellectually, emotionally, or spiritually. Our appearance, actions, professionalism, and words represent the Air Force and shape our Air Force culture and the reputation of the entire military profession.

Teamwork. Teamwork is essential to triumph at every level. Airmen recognize the interdependency of every member's contributions toward the mission and strive for organizational excellence. We not only give our personal best, but also challenge and motivate each other to give their best. We gain respect through our actions and strong work ethic to build team trust. We carry our own weight, and whenever necessary, help our wingmen carry theirs.

"Wake up every day, work hard, stay humble and repeat."

CMSAF Kaleth O. Wright, 18th Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force

2019 Air Force Handbook

25.9. Core Values - Defined

Professional Air Force ethics consist of three fundamental and enduring values (core values) of Integrity First, Service Before Self, and Excellence In All We Do. Success hinges on the incorporation of these values into the character of every Airman. The Air Force core values represent the commitment each Airman makes when joining the Air Force and provide a foundation for leadership, decision-making, and success in every level of assignment, regardless of difficulty or dangers presented by the mission. In today's compressed, dynamic operational environment, an Airman does not have the luxury of examining each issue at leisure. He or she must fully internalize the core values to be able to expeditiously act in all situations while maintaining professional Air Force standards. In light of the demands placed upon our people to support security interests around the globe, each of these core values are essential.

Integrity provides the bedrock for our military endeavors, and is fortified by service to country. This, in turn, fuels the drive for excellence. Each core value can be distinctly defined and described as an essential aspect of our service. Additionally, each core value is interwoven and interdependent on the unyielding, unwavering commitment to uphold our standards at all times.

Integrity First. Integrity First is a character trait and the willingness to do what is right even when no one is looking. Being faithful to one's convictions is part of integrity. A person of integrity acts on conviction, demonstrating impeccable self-control without acting rashly. Following principles, acting with honor, maintaining independent judgment, and performing duties with impartiality, help to maintain integrity and avoid conflicts of interest. Integrity encompasses many characteristics indispensable to Airmen and makes us who we are and what we stand for. Integrity is as much a part of a professional reputation as an ability to fly or fix jets, operate a computer network, repair a runway, or defend an airbase. Integrity is the ability to hold together and properly regulate all the elements of one's personality. Integrity is the moral compass, the inner voice that keeps us on the right path when we are confronted with ethical challenges and personal temptations. An individual realizes integrity when thoughts and actions align with what he or she knows to be right.

Virtues of Integrity. The virtues of integrity include honesty, courage, and accountability.

- Honesty is the hallmark of integrity. Honesty means our words must be unquestionable so we preserve the trust that unites us through a common goal and purpose. Honesty requires us to evaluate our performance against standards, and to conscientiously and accurately report findings. This is the only way to preserve the trust we hold so dear with each other and with the population we serve.

- Courage is not the absence of fear, but doing the right thing despite the fear. Courage empowers us to take necessary personal or professional risks, make decisions that may be unpopular, and admit to our mistakes. Having the courage to take these actions is crucial for the mission, the Air Force, and the Nation.

- Accountability is responsibility with an audience. Accountability instills our responsibility while maintaining transparency and ownership for our actions. Our audience may be the American people, our units, our supervisors, our fellow Airmen, our families, our loved ones, and even ourselves. Accountable individuals maintain transparency, seek honest and constructive feedback, and take ownership of the outcomes of their actions and decisions. They are responsible to themselves and others, and refrain from actions which discredit themselves or our service.




Service Before Self. As an Air Force core value, Service Before Self represents an abiding dedication to the age-old military virtue of selfless dedication to duty, including putting one's life at risk if called to do so. Service Before Self tells us that professional duties take precedence over personal desires. Airmen are practitioners of the profession of arms, entrusted with the security of the Nation, the protection of its citizens, and the preservation of their way of life. In this capacity, Airmen serve as guardians of America's future, and this responsibility requires the needs of service and country to be placed before our own. In today's world, service to country requires not only a high degree of skill, but also a willingness to make personal sacrifices. Airmen work long hours to provide the most combat capability possible for the taxpayer dollar. Military duties require us to perform on temporary duty assignments, accept permanent changes of station, and deploy to the far corners of the globe without complaint, to execute the mission in extremely harsh conditions to meet national security needs.

Having the heart and mindset for service allows us to embrace expectations and requirements not levied on the American public or other professions. The reasons professionals remain with the Air Force cannot be counted or measured. Military professionals gain satisfaction from doing something purposeful, gain pride in significantly contributing to an organization that lives by high standards, and gain a sense of accomplishment from defending the Nation and its people.

Virtues of Service Before Self. The virtues of Service Before Self include duty, loyalty, and respect.

- Duty. While duty is the obligation to perform what is required for the mission as determined by the law, the Department of Defense, and Air Force instructions, directives, and guidance, duty may also involve having to make sacrifices in ways that no other profession has or will. Our sense of duty is a personal one and bound by the oath of service we took as individuals.

- Loyalty. Loyalty is an internal commitment to the Nation, to the values and commitments of our Air Force, and to the men and women with whom we serve. Loyalty to our leaders requires us to trust, follow, and execute their decisions; offer alternative solutions and innovative ideas most effectively through the chain of command; and ultimately help each other to always act with honor.

- Respect. Respect is treating others with dignity and valuing them as individuals. We must always act knowing that all Airmen possess a fundamental worth as human beings and treat others with the utmost dignity and respect, understanding that our diversity is a powerful source of strength.

















Excellence In All We Do. Excellence In All We Do directs us to develop a sustained passion for the continuous improvement and innovation that propels the Air Force, as well as ourselves, beyond the capabilities of our adversaries. This core value demands that Airmen constantly strive to perform at our best. Adherence of this core value means that Airmen seek out and complete developmental education; constantly work hard to stay in physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, and moral shape; continue to enhance professional competencies; and are diligent to maintain their job skills, knowledge, and personal readiness at the highest possible levels. We must have a passion for continuous improvement and innovation that propels America's Air Force in quantum leaps towards accomplishment and performance.



Virtues of Excellence In All We Do. The virtues of excellence include mission, discipline, and teamwork.

- Mission. Having a mission focus encompasses operation, product, and resource excellence. The complex undertaking of the Air Force mission requires us to harness the ingenuity, expertise, and collective effort of all Airmen. We approach it with the mindset of stewardship, initiative, improvement, pride, and a continued commitment to anticipate and embrace change. Our people are the platform for delivering innovative ideas, strategies, and technologies to the fight. Our work areas, our processes, and our interpersonal interactions must be undeniably professional and positive.

- Discipline. Discipline is an individual commitment to uphold the highest of personal and professional standards. We demonstrate it in attitude, work ethic, and effort directed at continuous improvement, whether pursuing professional military education or nurturing ourselves physically, intellectually, emotionally, or spiritually. The appearance, actions, and words of Airmen represent the Air Force and shape the culture of the Air Force and the reputation of the military profession.

- Teamwork. Teamwork is essential at every level. Airmen recognize the interdependency of every member's contribution toward the mission and strive for organizational excellence as a team. We not only give our personal best, but also challenge and motivate each other. We carry our own weight, and whenever necessary, help our wingmen carry theirs. We serve in the greatest Air Force in the world, and we embrace the idea that our part of the Air Force meets that world-class standard.





Section 24D, Ethical Standards

The title of Section 24D changed from "Warrior Ethos" to "Ethical Standards". Paragraph 25.10. The Warrior Ethos, was deleted.

Paragraph 24.3. Code of Ethics: lots of editing but no significant changes

Paragraph 24.3.1. Ethical Dilemma: minor editing; no significant changes

Paragraph 24.3.2. Honorable Characteristics: minor editing and the lengthy examples of Valor, Courage, and Sacrifice, were removed.

Paragraph 24.4. The Airman's Creed: minor editing; no significant changes



2021 E-6 Study Guide

Not Included

2019 Air Force Handbook

25.10. The Warrior Ethos

Building warrior leaders requires employing Airmen who have the competencies and skills to understand the complexity of expeditionary operations in unilateral, joint, or coalition operations. Each Airman should understand and be able to articulate the full potential and application of Air Force capabilities required to support the Air Force mission and meet national security objectives.

As Airmen, we proudly serve in the most lethal Air Force the world has ever seen. We have inherited an Air Force forged through the ingenuity, courage, and strength of Airmen who preceded us. It is our duty to continue to provide the Nation and the next generation of Airmen an equally dominant force. Doing so requires a full understanding of the profession of arms, the commitment made by taking an oath of office, and the acceptance of living according to the Air Force's core values. This understanding, commitment, and acceptance is the warrior ethos that builds the confidence and commitment necessary to shape professional Airmen who are able to work as a team to accomplish the mission. The warrior ethos is demonstrated through expeditionary service in garrison, during combat, through humanitarian response and disaster relief operations, and by the lessons learned from those experiences. The warrior ethos is also developed and sustained over the course of a career through a continuum of learning, focused training and education, associated developmental experiences, and a wide variety of assignments. No less important is the strengthening of the warrior ethos through exhibiting pride in the Air Force uniform, physical conditioning, and understanding of the Air Force symbols, history, and culture.

2021 E-6 Study Guide

24.3. Code of Ethics.

As a member of the Air Force, you must practice the highest standards of conduct and integrity, not only in your job, but also in your relationships, personal financial dealings, and interactions with the civilian community. Whereas moral values describe what we hold to be right and wrong, ethics is the systematic reflection of these values enabling us to live and act according to our beliefs. Although following the law is ethical, laws only tell us what we can and cannot do. Ethics, on the other hand, tells us what we should or shouldn't do. Thus, Airmen must follow the law, but simply doing so is not enough. Airmen must also develop a code of ethics such that your behavior and motives do not create even the appearance of impropriety while providing a larger standard to live up to. Your commitment to integrity and excellence will lead the way for others to follow. Nonetheless, personal values, such as happiness or stability, while almost always present, must not take precedence over Air Force's ethical values. The key is to align ethical values with personal values, and enhance the commitment we have made to the dedicated service of our Nation. Our ethical code is prescribed in our core values, our oaths, the Airman's Creed, Air Force instructions, Professions of Arms, and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. When faced with decisions related to mission, personal life, or the interest of peers, the choice can always be made with consideration for our ethical code.

Principles and Guidelines. Embedded in our code of ethics, and driven by our competence and character, are key guidelines that help clarify acceptable and unacceptable behavior, but also aspirational values about who we want to be. Principles and ethical guidelines can be used to help identify what right looks like and continue to fortify our Air Force culture. Title 5, CFR, Part 2635, Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch, establishes the basic ethical principles and guidelines that must be followed by every government employee. A few examples of ethical expectations outlined in the regulation are provided here.

- Public service is a public trust, requiring employees to place loyalty to the Constitution, the laws,and ethical principles, above private gain.

- Employees shall not hold financial interests that conflict with the conscientious performance of duty.

- Employees shall not solicit or accept any gift or other item of monetary value from any person or entity seeking official action from, doing business with, or conducting activities regulated by the employee's agency, or whose interests may be substantially affected by the performance or nonperformance of the employee's duties.

- Employees shall not knowingly make unauthorized commitments or promises of any kind purporting to bind the government.

- Employees shall act impartially and not give preferential treatment to any private organization or individual.

- Employees shall protect and conserve federal property and shall not use it for other than authorized activities.

- Employees shall satisfy, in good faith, their obligations as citizens, including all just financial obligations, especially federal, state, or local taxes that are imposed by law.

- Employees may generally not accept gifts from subordinates or employees that make less pay than themselves.

- Employees may not solicit a donation or a contribution from other personnel for a gift to a superior, make a donation for a gift to a superior official, or accept a gift from subordinate personnel, except for voluntary gifts or contributions of nominal value (not to exceed $10), on occasions of special personal significance (such as marriage or birth of a child), or occasions that terminate the superior-subordinate relationship, such as retirement, permanent change of station or assignment.

2019 Air Force Handbook

25.11. Code of Ethics

As stated in AFI 1-1, Air Force Standards, as a member of the Air Force, the highest standards of conduct and integrity must be practiced, not only on the job, but also in relationships, in financial dealings, and in interaction with the civilian community. The code of ethics must be such that behavior and motives do not create even the appearance of impropriety. Personal values, such as happiness or stability, are almost always present, but they must not take precedence over ethical values. Ethical values relate to what is right and wrong, and thus take precedence over non-ethical values when making decisions. The key is to align ethical values with personal values, and enhance the commitment we have made to the dedicated service of our Nation. Our ethical code is prescribed in our core values, our oaths, the Airman's Creed, Air Force instructions, and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. When faced with decisions related to mission, personal life, or the interest of peers, the choice can always be made with consideration for our ethical code.




Principles and Guidelines. Embedded in our code of ethics, and driven by our competence and character, are key guidelines that help clarify acceptable and unacceptable behavior. Principles and ethical guidelines can be used to help identify what right looks like and continue to fortify our Air Force culture. Title 5, CFR, Part 2635, Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch, establishes the basic ethical principles and guidelines that must be followed by every government employee. A few examples of ethical expectations outlined in the regulation are provided here.

- Public service is a public trust, requiring employees to place loyalty to the Constitution, the laws, and ethical principles, above private gain.

- Employees shall not hold financial interests that conflict with the conscientious performance of duty.

- An employee shall not solicit or accept any gift or other item of monetary value from any person or entity seeking official action from, doing business with, or conducting activities regulated by the employee's agency, or whose interests may be substantially affected by the performance or nonperformance of the employee's duties.

- Employees shall not knowingly make unauthorized commitments or promises of any kind purporting to bind the government.

- Employees shall act impartially and not give preferential treatment to any private organization or individual.

- Employees shall protect and conserve federal property and shall not use it for other than authorized activities.

- Employees shall satisfy, in good faith, their obligations as citizens, including all just financial obligations, especially federal, state, or local taxes that are imposed by law.

- Employees may generally not accept gifts from subordinates or employees that make less pay than themselves.

- Employees may not solicit a donation or a contribution from other personnel for a gift to a superior, make a donation for a gift to a superior official, or accept a gift from subordinate personnel, except for voluntary gifts or contributions of nominal value (not to exceed $10), on occasions of special personal significance (such as marriage or birth of a child), or occasions that terminate the superior-subordinate relationship, such as retirement, permanent change of station or assignment.

2021 E-6 Study Guide

24.3.1. Ethical Dilemma

An ethical dilemma is a situation where one is forced to choose between at least two alternatives. Three general causes or sources of ethical dilemmas are: uncertainty, competing values, and potential harm. Uncertainty is the result of not having all the facts pertaining to a situation; not having enough experience for dealing with a situation; or not having a clearly established policy, procedure, or rules for deciding how to make an optimal decision. Competing values occur when our personal values conflict with those of our institution, subordinates, peers, or supervisors; however, the mark of a true professional is maintaining high professional standards despite conflicting values by locating the conflicting values, weighing one's options, and deciding upon the best course of action. Potential harm relates to the intentional and unintentional short and long-term consequences caused by our actions.

Decisions and Actions. As Airmen, we should always think through second and third order effects of our actions. We must apply a sense of order to our priorities so we are able to overcome temptation to stray from our military norms and values. When contemplating what to do, consider possible courses of action by listing to the best options and quality checking ideas to take the right path. When possible, take the decision process to the next level and put each course of action to the test. Dr. Robert M. Hicks, former Deputy Director of the Civil Air Patrol, Chaplain Services, identified three tests we can use to check the morality of our actions and decisions.

The Network Test. The network test consists of asking yourself, "How would this decision look if it was aired on the news?" If your actions were broadcast on the evening news, would you be proud of your actions or ashamed? Would your actions bring credit to yourself and the Air Force or would they discredit yourself or those we owe? If you find yourself leaning toward a negative response to these questions, then your decision doesn't pass the network test.

The United States of America Test. The United States of America test focuses on asking yourself,"Is this decision good for the United States? Is this decision good for the Air Force? Is this decision good for my unit (us)? Is this decision good for me?" If you take this course of action, are you properly ordering your priorities? If you can't answer with a resounding yes, this might not be the best decision.

The Divine Test. The divine test deals with asking yourself, "Would I feel good about the decision when I give account for my life?" When telling the story of your proud and honorable service to our country, would you include conversation about this decision? Would you feel guilt or loss of trust from this action? If you can't confidently provide a positive response, the course of action fails the divine test.

2019 Air Force Handbook

25.12. Ethical Dilemma

An ethical dilemma is a situation where one is forced to choose between at least two alternatives. Three general causes or sources of ethical dilemmas are: uncertainty, competing values, and potential harm. Uncertainty is the result of not having all the facts pertaining to a situation; not having enough experience for dealing with a situation; or not having a clearly established policy, procedure, or rules for deciding how to make an optimal decision. Competing values occur when our personal values conflict with those of our institution, subordinates, peers, or supervisors; however, the mark of a true professional is maintaining high professional standards despite conflicting values. Potential harm relates to the intentional and unintentional consequences caused by actions.

Decisions and Actions. Airmen should always think through second and third order effects of our actions. We must apply a sense of order to our priorities so we are able to overcome temptation to stray from our military norms and values. When contemplating what to do, consider possible courses of action by listing to the best options and quality checking ideas to take the right path. When possible, take the decision process to the next level and put each course of action to the test. Dr. Robert M. Hicks, former Deputy Director of the Civil Air Patrol, Chaplain Services, identified three tests we can use to check the morality of our actions and decisions.

- The Network Test. The network test consists of asking yourself, "How would this decision look if it was aired on the news?" If your actions were broadcast on the evening news, would you be proud of your actions or ashamed of your actions? Would your actions bring credit to yourself and the Air Force or would they discredit yourself or those we owe? If you find yourself leaning toward a negative response to these questions, then your decision doesn't pass the network test.

- The United States of America Test. The United States of America test focuses on asking yourself, "Is this decision good for the United States? Is this decision good for the U.S. Air Force? Is this decision good for my unit (us)? Is this decision good for me?" If you take this course of action, are you properly ordering your priorities? If you can't answer with a resounding yes, this might not be the best decision.

- The Devine Test. The divine test deals with asking yourself, "Would I feel good about the decision when I give account for my life?" When telling the story of your proud and honorable service to our country, would you include conversation about this decision? Would you feel guilt or loss of trust from this action? If you can't confidently provide a positive response, the course of action fails the divine test.

2021 E-6 Study Guide

24.3.2. Honorable Characteristics

Airmen share a history of valor, courage, and sacrifice. From the earliest days of airpower to the heights of space, Airmen have built an extraordinary heritage that forms the foundation for a boundless horizon. We are technology focused, we embrace change, and through transformation and innovation, we ensure a viable Air Force for the future.

Always keep focus on demonstrating honorable service and commitment to the profession of arms. Through skills, knowledge, and experience developed in the Air Force, listen to your internal compass while fostering the same in your peers. Remind yourself and your peers of the reason you do what you do. Declare the importance of serving for a higher cause, adhering to established ethical codes, and embracing an Air Force culture steeped in honor and tradition. Rely on what you know is true and what is right. Be the Airman who makes decisions and leads in a way you can be proud of.

Airmen firmly grounded in the core values react to combat stresses, operational deployment pressures, and daily home station demands with valor, courage, and sacrifice. While many acts of valor, courage, or sacrifice go unseen, they should be recognized not only as part of Air Force culture, but also to illustrate that any Airman may be called upon at any time to perform above and beyond in the profession of arms.

Valor. Valor is the ability to face danger or hardship in a determined and resolute manner. Valor is commonly and rightly recognized as bravery, fearlessness, fortitude, gallantry, heart, and nerve. When acting with valor, one expresses the willingness to step outside the comfort zone to deal with unexpected situations. Such situations can happen almost anywhere. In addition to demonstrating valor on the battlefield, an Airman can exhibit valor when presented with unusual circumstances in the daily routine of life.

Courage. Courage is about the ability to face fear, danger, or adversity. Three types of courage are critical in the profession of arms: personal, physical, and moral. Personal courage is about doing what's right even when risking one's career. Physical courage is the ability to overcome fears of bodily harm to get the job done, or willingness to risk harm to yourself for someone else's sake in battle or the course of everyday life. Finally, moral courage is the ability to stand by the core values when moral courage may not be the popular thing to do. Integrity breeds courage when and where the behavior is most needed. More often than not, courage is manifested as an act of bravery on the battlefield when Airmen face the challenges present in combat.

Sacrifice. Sacrifice involves a willingness to give your time, comfort, or life to meet others' needs. Personal sacrifice occurs on many levels, but is commonly evident in the heroic actions of Airmen in combat. Day-to-day deployed garrison activities also present opportunities to put others' needs before individual wants.

Call to Duty. Airmen are wingmen, leaders, and warriors with backgrounds and skills as diverse as our Nation. When America's sons and daughters commit to service, the Air Force takes on the charge to develop them into Airmen. The Air Force culture is one that embraces diversity and fiercely protects its foundational attributes. Over the next 30 years, the Air Force's ability to continue to adapt and respond faster than our potential adversaries will depend on the flexibility and adaptability of our current and next generation Airmen. We will recruit, develop, and retain exceptional Airmen through strategies and programs designed to develop and care for our Total Force, strengthen the Air Force culture, and leverage development opportunities that employ creative concepts across the force. When faced with the call to duty, we must remember that we are Airmen. As Airmen, we understand the price that is paid for freedom and the sacrifices that come from willing service to our country. We understand the meaning of belonging to the profession of arms.

2019 Air Force Handbook

25.13. Honorable Characteristics

Airmen share a history of valor, courage, and sacrifice. From the earliest days of airpower to the heights of space, Airmen have built an extraordinary heritage that forms the foundation for a boundless horizon. We are technology focused, we embrace change, and through transformation and innovation, we ensure a viable Air Force for the future.

Always keep focus on demonstrating honorable service and commitment to the profession of arms. Through skills, knowledge, and experience developed in the Air Force, listen to your internal compass while fostering the same in your peers. Remind yourself and your peers of the reason you do what you do. Declare the importance of serving for a higher cause, adhering to established ethical codes, and embracing an Air Force culture steeped in honor and tradition. Rely on what you know is true and what is right. Be the Airman who makes decisions and leads in a way you can be proud of.

Airmen firmly grounded in the core values and ingrained with the warrior ethos react to combat stresses, operational deployment pressures, and daily home station demands with valor, courage, and sacrifice. While many acts of valor, courage, or sacrifice go unseen, they should be recognized not only as part of Air Force culture, but also to illustrate that any Airman may be called upon at any time to perform above and beyond in the profession of arms.

Valor. Valor is the ability to face danger or hardship in a determined and resolute manner. Valor is commonly and rightly recognized as bravery, fearlessness, fortitude, gallantry, heart, and nerve. When acting with valor, one expresses the willingness to step outside the comfort zone to deal with unexpected situations. Such situations can happen almost anywhere. In addition to demonstrating valor on the battlefield, an Airman can exhibit valor when presented with unusual circumstances in the daily routine of life.

Consider the demonstration of valor in the following quotation from the Air Force Memorial in Washington, D.C.

In the summer of 2005, Senior Airman Shea Dodson wanted to do more than his assigned administrative duties inside of Baghdad's Green Zone. The call was out for volunteers to provide security for ongoing convoys, so Airman Dodson raised his hand. After some intense just-in-time training, he was performing security detail for his first convoy. On this mission, Airman Dodson put that training to good use. When a suspected vehicle-borne suicide bomber raced toward the convoy, he fired .50 caliber rounds into the engine block no fewer than four times, disabling the vehicle. During the same mission, his unit became mired in traffic near a high-rise development. He noticed movement above and saw an Iraqi armed with an AK-47 creeping toward the edge of a balcony overlooking the convoy. Airman Dodson immediately engaged with indirect warning fire from his M-16, hitting the wall next to the suspected insurgent's head. The armed Iraqi dove for cover and never returned. When the convoy arrived at its final destination, a children's school, he continued with a complete security sweep of the perimeter houses to ensure it was clear. Airman Dodson remained on armed watch as his team handed out school supplies to the kids in the open courtyard. By two o'clock that same day, Airman Dodson was back at his desk, keeping track of critical data for the Commanding General of the Multinational Security Transition Command-Iraq. It was all in a day's work for this dedicated Airman.

Courage. Courage is about the ability to face fear, danger, or adversity. Three types of courage are critical in the profession of arms: personal, physical, and moral. Personal courage is about doing what's right even when risking one's career. Physical courage is the ability to overcome fears of bodily harm to get the job done, or willingness to risk harm to yourself for someone else's sake in battle or the course of everyday life. Finally, moral courage is the ability to stand by the core values when moral courage may not be the popular thing to do. Integrity breeds courage when and where the behavior is most needed. More often than not, courage is manifested as an act of bravery on the battlefield when Airmen face the challenges present in combat.

Demonstration of Courage. Consider the demonstration of courage in the following quotation from the Air Force Memorial in Washington, D.C.

While on a special mission in Southwest Asia in 2005, Technical Sergeant Corey Clewley was loading cargo on his aircraft when he saw a Romanian C-130 experience a hard landing. Unbeknownst to the Romanian crew, the aircraft brakes caused a fire, causing Sergeant Clewley to spring into action. He instructed a fellow loadmaster to inform his aircraft commander of the situation and to ensure that someone contacted the control tower of the fire while he and a crew chief grabbed fire extinguishers and ran toward the burning aircraft. The Romanian C-130 fire intensified as it spread to the aircraft's fuselage and ruptured the hydraulic brake line. Despite the danger to himself, Sergeant Clewley got within a few feet of the flames and attempted to suppress the fire. His sense of urgency tripled when he realized the C-130 crew was still inside the aircraft and was unable to get out of the burning aircraft. He saw a member of the crew mouthing 'please, please' and pointing to the troop exit door. Sergeant Clewley refocused his attention to that area and began suppressing the fire, enabling the crew to safely exit the aircraft. He continued to keep the fire under control until the fire department arrived. Sergeant Clewley credits the team effort that kept the incident from becoming a deadly event and never considered the risk to his own life as he worked to save a crew and aircraft that was not part of his responsibility, his service, or even his Nation. He noted that saving the lives of the people on board was more important than who owned the aircraft.

Sacrifice. Sacrifice involves a willingness to give your life, time, or comfort to meet others' needs. Personal sacrifice occurs on many levels, but is commonly evident in the heroic actions of Airmen in combat. Day-to-day deployed garrison activities also present opportunities to put others' needs before individual wants.

Demonstration of Sacrifice. Consider the demonstrations of sacrifice as quoted in the words of those who have served before us. The following quote is from a letter written by Sergeant Carl Goldman to his parents. Sergeant Goldman was a U.S. Army Air Forces B-17 gunner who was killed in Western Europe during World War II. His parents had the quote inscribed at the American Cemetery and Memorial in Cambridge, England, in his honor.

...Am going on a raid this afternoon...there is a possibility I won't return...do not worry about me as everyone has to leave this earth one way or another, and this is the way I have selected. If after this terrible war is over, the world emerges a saner place...pogroms and persecutions halted, then I'm glad I gave my efforts with thousands of others for such a cause.

- Sergeant Carl Goldman, U.S. Army Air Forces, WWII

This next quote is from a letter written by Sergeant Arnold Rahe to his parents. Sergeant Rahe was in the U.S. Army Air Forces and was killed in France during World War II.

As I prepare for this...mission, I am a bit homesick... Mother and Dad, you are very close to me, and I long so to talk to you. America has asked much of our generation, but I'm glad to give her all I have because she has given me so much.

- Sergeant Arnold Rahe, U.S. Army Air Forces, WWII

Call to Duty. Airmen are wingmen, leaders, and warriors with backgrounds and skills as diverse as our Nation. When America's sons and daughters commit to service, the Air Force takes on the charge to develop them into Airmen. The Air Force culture is one that embraces diversity and fiercely protects its foundational attributes. Over the next 30 years, the Air Force's ability to continue to adapt and respond faster than our potential adversaries will depend on the flexibility and adaptability of our current and next generation Airmen. We will recruit, develop, and retain exceptional Airmen through strategies and programs designed to develop and care for our Total Force, strengthen the Air Force culture, and leverage development opportunities that employ creative concepts across the force. When faced with the call to duty, we must remember that we are Airmen. As Airmen, we understand the price that is paid for freedom and the sacrifices that come from willingly serving our country. We understand the meaning of belonging to the profession of arms.

2021 E-6 Study Guide

24.4. The Airman's Creed

The Airman's Creed was presented to the Air Force in 2007 by General T. Michael Moseley, 18th Air Force Chief of Staff. General Moseley introduced the creed as an aspect of one of his top priorities to reinvigorate the Total Force. The intent of the creed was to enhance the building of a warrior ethos among Airmen and establish a coherent bond between the members of the Air Force.

THE AIRMAN'S CREED

I am an American Airman.
I am a Warrior.
I have answered my Nation's call.

I am an American Airman.
My mission is to Fly, Fight, and Win.
I am faithful to a Proud Heritage,
A Tradition of Honor,
And a Legacy of Valor.

I am an American Airman.
Guardian of Freedom and Justice,
My Nation's Sword and Shield,
Its Sentry and Avenger.
I defend my Country with my Life.

I am an American Airman.
Wingman, Leader, Warrior.
I will never leave an Airman behind,
I will never falter,
And I will not fail.


2019 Air Force Handbook

25.14. The Airman's Creed

The Airman's Creed was presented to the Air Force in 2007 by General T. Michael Moseley, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force. Moseley introduced the creed as an aspect of one of his top priorities to reinvigorate the Total Force. The intent of the creed was to enhance the building of a warrior ethos among Airmen and establish a coherent bond between the members of the U.S. Air Force.

THE AIRMAN'S CREED

I am an American Airman.
I am a Warrior.
I have answered my Nation's call.

I am an American Airman.
My mission is to Fly, Fight, and Win.
I am faithful to a Proud Heritage,
A Tradition of Honor,
And a Legacy of Valor.

I am an American Airman.
Guardian of Freedom and Justice,
My Nation's Sword and Shield,
Its Sentry and Avenger.
I defend my Country with my Life.

I am an American Airman.
Wingman, Leader, Warrior.
I will never leave an Airman behind,
I will never falter,
And I will not fail.